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    Home Chronic Pain How to Prepare for a Doctor's Appointment

    How to Prepare for a Doctor’s Appointment

    A basic plan can help you make the most of your appointment whether you are starting with a new doctor or continuing with the doctor you’ve seen for years. The following tips will make it easier for you and your doctor to cover everything you need to talk about.

    List and Prioritize Your Concerns

    Make a list of what you want to discuss. For example, do you have a new symptom you want to ask the doctor about? Do you want to get a flu shot? Are you concerned about how a treatment is affecting your daily life? If you have more than a few items to discuss, put them in order and ask about the most important ones first. Don’t put off the things that are really on your mind until the end of your appointment—bring them up right away! Discussing Your Concerns with the Doctor: Worksheet can help.

    Take Information with You

    Some doctors suggest you put all your prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal remedies or supplements in a bag and bring them with you. Others recommend you bring a list of everything you take and the dose. You should also take your insurance cards, names and phone numbers of other doctors you see, and your medical records if the doctor doesn’t already have them.

    Consider Bringing a Family Member or Friend

    Sometimes it is helpful to bring a family member or close friend with you. Let your family member or friend know in advance what you want from your visit. Your companion can remind you what you planned to discuss with the doctor if you forget. She or he can take notes for you and can help you remember what the doctor said.

    Tips: Getting Started with a New Doctor

    Your first meeting is a good time to talk with the doctor and the office staff about some communication basics.

    First name or last name. When you see the doctor and office staff, introduce yourself and let them know by what name you prefer to be called. For example: “Hello, my name is Mrs. Martinez,” or “Good morning, my name is Bob Smith. Please call me Bob.”

    Ask how the office runs. Learn what days are busiest and what times are best to call. Ask what to do if there is an emergency, or if you need a doctor when the office is closed.

    Share your medical history. Tell the doctor about your illnesses, operations, medical conditions, and other doctors you see. You may want to ask the doctor to send you a copy of the medical history form before your visit so you can fill it out at home, where you have the time and information you need to complete it. If you have problems understanding how to fill out any of the forms, ask for help. Some community organizations provide this kind of help.

    Share former doctors’ names. Give the new doctor all of your former doctors’ names and addresses, especially if they are in a different city. This is to help your new doctor get copies of your medical records. Your doctor will ask you to sign a medical release form giving him or her permission to request your records.

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    Maren Naderhttps://www.datenightmeals.com
    Maren Auxier is a freelance writer for Pain Resource. She is passionate about helping patients find ways to feel better and live better lives. In her spare time, Maren enjoys exercising, hiking, yoga and cooking.

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